Projects

All-Optical Displacement and Angle Sensing with Differential Interferometric Readout via Volume Holographic Multiplexing

Term Project for MAS 836 (MIT): Sensor Technologies for Interactive Environments

A proof-of-concept system for interferometric displacement measurement of a rotatable surface was designed and realized using an angular-multiplexed volume holographic optical element with Bragg-matched angle readout. The realization of an all-optical sensing scheme for both angle and displacement measurements with interferometric precision can be scaled for implementation in future MEMS sensing devices.

All-Optical Displacement and Angle Sensing with Differential Interferometric Readout via Volume Holographic Multiplexing (Presentation)

Efficient Auditory Coding with Prediction Schemes

Term Project for ECE 8833 (Georgia Tech): Information Processing in Neural Systems
Advisor: Prof. Christopher Rozell

Neural coding schemes in the brain specify how information, sensory or otherwise, is encoded by neurons and have been suggested to be of critical importance in the efficient representation of sensory information. In particular, it has been suggested that sensory coding schemes in mammalian vision and audition systems act to maximize the transfer of sensory information to the brain while minimizing resource consumption.

This project aimed to further examine the notion that efficient auditory codes (e.g., as proposed originally by Smith & Lewicki in a 2006 Nature paper) can explain real physiological properties of mammalian auditory systems. In particular, we examined the notion that auditory sensory information is encoded in a resource-minimizing optimal sense assuming the presence of a predictive filtering scheme.

Efficient and Causality-Preserving Auditory Coding with Prediction Schemes (Paper)
Efficient and Causality-Preserving Auditory Coding with Prediction Schemes (Presentation)

Fault Characterization for Data-Driven Wire Health Management

Internship Project with Intelligent Systems Division, NASA Ames Research Center
Advisor: Dr. Kevin Wheeler

Recently, there has been an increased demand for robust, reliable, and minimally invasive techniques for wire health evaluation in aircraft. Despite advances in hardware systems for confirming fault existence, there still exists a lack of robust software-based approaches for accurately diagnosing and precisely locating faults. A novel model-based diagnostic system for wire health management has recently been proposed and employs a data-driven paradigm for effectively characterizing, simulating, and modeling several types of common faults occurring in aircraft wiring. Simulating and modeling various fault types for this system requires a sufficient quantity of reliable data concerning the electrical character of the fault at hand.

This project was aimed at the further development of a wire fault generation and characterization system using several experimental chafing apparatuses along with high-resolution time-domain reflectometry techniques and equipment. A robust LabVIEW environment was developed for automated fault generation and characterization.

Automated Fault Generation and Characterization for Data-Driven Wire Health Management (Final Report)